Natural News Blogs 7 Benefits of Coconut Water You Probably Don’t Know » Natural News Blogs

 

7 Benefits of Coconut Water You Probably Don’t Know

Coconut water, this low-fat health drink has been gaining popularity since many years and it’s a wise choice, as it’s cholesterol free, 99% fat-free, low in carbs and been considered as one of the healthiest foods. It’s recommended that you drink coconut water regularly, for your overall health and energy for the body, choose fresh young coconuts in the local markets for the best benefits, and remember, the fresher the coconut water, the better, as it rapidly loses its nutritional value once exposed to air.

Here are 7 benefits of coconut water that explain why it has become so popular:

  • Reduces blood pressure

According to research, coconut water helps reduce the risk of heart attacks by lowering high blood pressure, this is because of the unique nutritional content of coconut water, it’s rich in vitamin C, potassium and magnesium, which are linked to reduce the high blood pressure levels.

  • Aids Weight Loss

As mentioned above, coconut water is cholesterol free, 99% fat-free,low in carbs and a cup of coconut water contains only 46 calories. So if you want to lose more pounds, add coconut water in your diet chart. As it is packed with fiber, it also makes you feel full and reduce cravings.

  • Boosts the immune system

Coconut water is packed with vitamins and types of nutrients such as niacin, thiamin, folates and pyridoxine, all of which are essential to increase your body’s immune system and fight infections.

  • Relieves cold or flu

Hydrating is important when you get a cold or flu, and to keep proper hydrated, the body requires electrolytes, coconut water contain all five electrolytes your body needs,including potassium, it contains more potassium than other sports drinks, and once you’re more hydrated, you’ll feel better.

  • Keeps your skin youthful

Many beauty products such as creams, shampoos and conditioners with coconut extract are more effective, because coconut water is packed with antioxidants, which help to moisturize your skin from inside and slow the aging process. And apply coconut water on your face can help relieve the acne, pimple and other issues on the surface of your skin.

  • It’s good for diabetes patients

Coconut water has a lot of nutrients that are very helpful for diabetics, it helps to widen blood vessels to make blood flowing more smoothly. Besides, it contains several antioxidants, minerals and omega 3 fatty acids which are all important factors in diabetes management.

  • Cures a hangover

Many people believe that coconut water can cure a hangover, and for good reason. As alcohol robs your body of water, coconut water is very good for dehydration, drink it will enable your body and mind to function properly. Plus, you’ve got rid of minerals such as magnesium and potassium by passing lots of water, and coconut water is enriched with these minerals.

More from Alex Jordon:

6 Best Detox Foods You Should Start Eating

7 Fruits With Highest Calories

Diabetes: 10 Tips to Lose Weight without Losing Minds

4 amazing uses for aloe vera – NaturalNews.com

 

4 amazing uses for aloe vera

Wednesday, July 09, 2014 by: Michael Ravensthorpe
Tags: aloe vera, sunburn, skin care

(NaturalNews) Aloe vera (“true aloe”) is the best-known species of the aloe genus, which is native to Africa and certain parts of the Middle East. Renowned for its medicinal properties, aloe vera has been utilized for thousands of years to treat numerous medical conditions ranging from skin irritations and herpes to constipation and diabetes. Indeed, this succulent and mucilaginous plant was one of the most frequently prescribed medicines throughout the 18th and 19th centuries.

For the most part, aloe vera remains just as popular in the 21st century. Its green, spear-shaped leaves are a rich source of disease-fighting vitamins and minerals, and it is a common ingredient in countless cosmetic products. Due to its incomparable versatility, however, aloe vera has far more uses than most people realize.

Shaving gel

Aloe vera is a perfect natural substitute for those awful, chemical-laden shaving gels and creams found in drug stores. Firstly, the plant consists of approximately 95 percent water, so it provides a nice, slippery surface that allows for a pleasant, close shave. Secondly, it is packed with anti-inflammatory enzymes, making it good for treating shaving nicks and rashes. Lastly, it moisturizes and nourishes the skin, leaving it feeling soft and rejuvenated. You can use aloe vera gel alone for this purpose, or mix it with other skin-friendly ingredients, such as almond oil or eucalyptus oil, for an even more luxurious shave.

Treats bad breath

Bad breath, or halitosis, is a common medical condition that affects an estimated 1 in 4 people on a regular basis. Though commercial toothpastes and mouthwashes can help treat it, their aggressive and unnatural ingredients often leave a lot to be desired. Instead, consider aloe vera. Aside from being a potent antibacterial, aloe contains an anti-inflammatory compound named beta-Sisterol that is known to soothe acid indigestion, which (along with oral bacteria) is a common cause of bad breath.

Though aloe vera does work alone as a mouthwash and toothpaste, mixing it with baking soda seems to have a particularly powerful effect. Aloe vera oil can also be used for oil pulling, the ancient Ayurvedic practice of cleansing the mouth by swishing oil around it for between 15 and 20 minutes.

Makeup remover

Unlike commercial makeup removers, which often contain harsh chemicals that dehydrate the skin, aloe vera gel is a natural and gentle way to remove makeup (including makeup around the eye, where the skin is most delicate). Simply squeeze a dollop of the gel onto a cotton ball and gently rub the makeup from your face. Incidentally, refrigerated cotton balls soaked in aloe vera make an excellent compress for tired and puffy eyes.

Treats sunburn

Aloe vera’s benefits as a skin moisturizer are well-known, but it is often overlooked as a sunburn remedy. Yes, due to its cooling and hydrating properties, aloe vera is very effective at treating sun-damaged skin. Apply the gel or oil onto the affected area and leave it to soak. The aloe will act as protective layer atop the skin and allow it to replenish its moisture (hydrated skin recovers faster from sunburn than dry skin).

Sources for this article include:

http://www.twineagles.org/medicinal-uses-of-aloe-vera.html

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-5880/5-Awesome-Uses-for-Aloe-Vera.html

http://science.naturalnews.com/aloe_vera.html

About the author:
Michael Ravensthorpe is an independent writer whose research interests include nutrition, alternative medicine, and bushcraft. He is the creator of the website, Spiritfoods, through which he promotes the world’s healthiest foods.

5 Foods and Herbs for Healing Cancer » Natural News Blogs

5 Foods and Herbs for Healing Cancer

Much research has been done on cancer treatments in recent decades to improve therapies for the millions of Americans who are fighting this disease. What some may not be aware of, however, is that many foods and herbs have demonstrated potent anti-cancer properties and can improve both longevity and quality of life. Five of these are discussed below.

Sea Vegetables
Popular in Asia, sea vegetables such as kombu, kelp and nori (the seaweed best known in the preparation of sushi dishes) have all demonstrated remarkable abilities to fight cancer. They are a rich source of natural iodine, a deficiency of which has shown up in many ovarian and breast cancer patients. They also alkalize the body with high levels of calcium and potassium: the alkaline environment is very unfriendly to cancer cells.

Algae
Consumption of algae has been commonplace in Africa and Asia for generations, and the publicity received in recent years for the remarkable properties of algae like chlorella and spirulina has introduced it to the West. Algae are wonderful detoxifiers that can remove heavy metals from the body and strengthen the immune system by encouraging the growth of beneficial bacteria. They are also rich in Vitamins A, B, C, D, E and K as well as minerals like iron, zinc and magnesium. In addition, they contain incredibly potent antioxidants like beta-carotene which are renowned for their cancer-fighting power.

Cruciferous Vegetables
Cruciferous vegetables include cabbages, broccoli and cauliflower and are another powerful and natural way to fight cancer. Vegetables from this family all contain sulforaphane, a phytochemical that is able to detoxify cancer-causing agents before they are able to damage healthy cells; it also contains chemicals which believe help activate enzymes that detoxify the body. Inclusion of these vegetables in the diet is believed to lower the risk for cancer and halt the growth of tumors in the breast, female reproductive tract, colon, liver and lung.

Medicinal Mushrooms
Mushrooms like reishi and chaga also have the ability to fight cancer; this is due to the fact that they contain a rich array of active compounds including polysaccharides (a complex carbohydrate which can boost the immune system), polyphenols (molecules that are strong anti-oxidants), as well as flavonoids, folates, carotenoids and various enzymes and organic acids. This combination packs quite a powerful punch and have drawn the interest of researchers and oncologists. One recent study showed that regular inclusion of reishi in the diet did in fact prohibit the growth and proliferation of tumors.

Aloe Vera
Most people are aware of aloe vera as a topical medicine only, but when taken orally, its polysaccharides have been proven to modulate the immune system and fight the formation and growth of cancerous tumors. One study published in International Immunopharmacology found that these polysaccharides were able to stimulate the production of nitric oxide, which inhibits tumors. Aloe vera is also rich in minerals, vitamins, amino acids and phytochemicals that can eliminate bacteria, viruses and fungi from the body. This can make it a powerful tool for the body to use when fighting cancer.

A diet which includes any or all of the following foods does more than just boost the health. It nourishes the immune system and can help those battling cancer to live longer and have a better quality of life.

A List of Summer Picnic Bowls – 101 Cookbooks

A List of Summer Picnic Bowls

This coming weekend I’m planning a break from the fog. If all goes well, there will be sun-bright days, star-lit skies, pine trees, bare feet, and eating outdoors. There will be a river. There will be a grill. There will be a cabin. All the necessary components for California mountain summering. I’m incredibly excited. As soon as we solidified our plans I started going through my archives looking for ideas for good picnic-style salads to make, and found myself drafting a list of contenders. It occurred to me that it might be helpful to post the list here as well. Most of these salads are the sort that can be prepped, in large part, ahead of time. And they’re all meant to be served family-style as part of a larger spread. I hope it’s helpful. Here’s to long weekends, long days, and summer adventures. xo -h

 

Mung Yoga Bowl – The kind of bowl that keeps you strong – herb-packed yogurt dolloped over a hearty bowl of mung beans and quinoa, finished with toasted nuts and a simple paprika oil.

 

California Barley Bowl – Plump barley grains tossed with sprouts (or greens), nuts, avocado, a bit of cheese – all dolloped with a simple yogurt sauce.

 

Avocado Salad – thinly sliced avocado arranged over simple lentils, drizzled with oregano oil, toasted hazelnuts, and chives.

 

Roasted Vegetable Orzo – Roasted delicata squash and kale tossed w/ orzo pasta & salted yogurt dressing. For summer you can swap in seasonal squash or vegetables in place of the delicata.

 

Coconut Corn Salad – SImple. Butter a skillet add corn, fresh thyme, red onions, toasted almonds and coconut, and finish with a squeeze of lemon or lime juice.

 

Yellow Bean Salad – A summer yellow bean salad with a green chile-spiked, cilantro-flecked, and coconut milk dressing, toasted pepitas, and (if you want to make a meal of it) pan-fried tofu.

 

Heirloom Tomato Salad – A favorite tomato salad, made with roasted and ripe tomatoes, capers, mozzarella, almonds, and chives.

 

Ginger Soba Noodles – Soba noodles tossed with a creamy-ginger dressing and topped with crispy tofu, tarragon, and toasted delicata squash seeds.

Shaved Fennel Salad – Shaved fennel, arugula, zucchini coins, feta, toasted almonds.

 

Buttermilk Farro Salad – Farro with shaved radishes, zucchini, and fennel tossed with a tangy herbed buttermilk vinaigrette.

Why a Brisk Walk Is Better – NYTimes.com

Walking, fast or slow, is wonderful exercise. But now a first-of-its-kind study shows that to get the most health benefits from walking, many of us need to pick up the pace.

The findings stem from a new analysis of the National Walkers’ Health Study, a large database of information maintained at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory about thousands of middle-age men and women who walk regularly for exercise. Recruited beginning in 1998 at walking events and from lists of subscribers to walking-related publications, these volunteers filled out a lengthy survey about their typical walking distance and pace, as well as their health history and habits.

As most of us would likely guess, walking is the most popular physical activity in America. But people who walk for exercise do so at wildly varying speeds and intensities. Some stroll at a leisurely 2 miles per hour, which is low-intensity exercise. Others zip along at twice that pace or better, resulting in a sweatier workout.

Exercise guidelines generally suggest that for health purposes, people should engage in 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity most days of the week. For walkers, a moderately intense pace would probably be about 15 or 16 minutes per mile.

It has generally been assumed that if people walk more slowly but expend the same total energy as brisk walkers — meaning that they spend more time walking — they should gain the same health benefits. But few large-scale studies have directly compared the impact of moderate- and light-intensity walking, especially in terms of longevity.

To do so, Paul T. Williams, a statistician at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, gathered data about 7,374 male and 31,607 female participants from the walkers’ health study, who represented almost every speed of fitness walker, from sluggish to swift. His findings were published online this month in PLoS One.

Dr. Williams divided participants into four numerically equal categories, based on their normal pace. Those in Category 1, the fleetest, averaged less than 13.5 minutes per mile, putting them on the cusp of jogging, while those in Category 4, the slowest, strolled at a relatively dilatory 17 minutes or more per mile. The majority of the walkers in this group in fact required at least 20 minutes to complete a mile, and many had a pace of 25 minutes or more per mile. (Interestingly, on average, female walkers were faster than men in all of the categories.)

Next, Dr. Williams cross-referenced his data against that in the essential if somewhat ghoulish National Death Index to determine which of the almost 39,000 walkers had died in the decade or so since they had joined the survey and from what.

It turned out that nearly 2,000 of the walkers had died. More telling, these deaths disproportionately were clustered among the slowest walkers. Those in Category 4 were about 18 percent more likely to have died from any cause than those in the other three categories and were particularly vulnerable to deaths from heart disease and dementia.

Unexpectedly, the death rate remained high among the slowest walkers, even if they met or exceeded the standard exercise guidelines and expended as much energy per day as someone walking briskly for 30 minutes. This effect was most pronounced among the slowest of the slow walkers, whose pace was 24 minutes per mile or higher. They were 44 percent more likely to have died than walkers who moved faster, even if they met the exercise guidelines.

One important inference of these statistics is that intensity matters, if you are walking for health. “Our results do suggest that there is a significant health benefit to pursuing a faster pace,” Dr. Williams said. Pushing your body, he said, appears to cause favorable physiological changes that milder exercise doesn’t replicate.

But there are nuances and caveats to that conclusion. The slowest walkers may have harbored underlying health conditions that predisposed them to both a tentative walking pace and early death. But that possibility underscores a subtle takeaway of the new study, Dr. Williams said. Measuring your walking speed, he pointed out, could provide a barometer of your health status.

So check yours, your spouse’s or perhaps your parents’ pace. The process is easy. Simply find a 400-meter track and, using a stopwatch, have everyone walk at his or her normal speed. If a circuit of the track takes someone 6 minutes or more, that person’s pace is 24 minutes per mile or slower, and he or she might consider consulting a doctor about possible health issues, Dr. Williams said.

Then, with medical clearance, the slow walkers probably should try ramping up their speed, gradually.

The most encouraging news embedded in the new study is that longevity rises with small improvements in pace. The walkers in Category 3, for instance, moved at a speed only a minute or so faster per mile than some of those in the slowest group, but they enjoyed a significant reduction in their risk of dying prematurely.

B. regards

KS